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is a taliban honor student. before that drone blows you up blow yourself up. take down sign reading 137 days without a drone strike. >> bret: good tips. some are better than others, charles. thanks forever inviting us into your home tonight. that is it for this "special report" fair balanced and unafraid. >> this is the fox report. tonight, the real story about the security situation in afghanistan. it turns out the numbers the pentagon told us about to tout how well they were doing are wrong. plus nks a hot air balloon explodes? mid-air. tourists killed by more than a dozen. >> i hear a loud explosion and see a lot of smoke. >> shepard: witnesses say the blast shook the ground and some passengers jumped seven stories trying to escape the burning balloon. tonight, searching for answers as the blame game begins. plus,. [bell] >> shepard: 20 years ago today. [sirens] >> shepard: terrorists tried to bring down the world trade center. >> it was just so infamiliar tommable. >> a new warning about americans joining forces with al qaeda. and why didn't we think of this sooner? dennis rodman brings
girl who survived being shot in the head by the taliban is speaking clearly and has now released her own video statement. the brave teenager's message to the world, a show of resilience for you this monday next. >>> also last night's battle between the ravens and 49ers set a new record for the longest super bowl ever, thanks in part to this, the blackout during the third quarter. we're going to take a look what may have caused the outage. is it beyonce's fault, jon? that is the big question. the halftime show, did it do it? jon: you know, at least people drank a lot of beer during that 34 minutes. jenna: it apparently helped the television ratings as welcoming across from the "new york times." very interesting. big story for us. we'll get to the bottom of this mystery, hopefully next. jon: new developments in the remarkable recovery of that pakistani teenager who defied the taliban. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was shot in the head last year after she spoke out for the rights of girls to get an education. now she is releasing a video statement speaking clearly about her recovery. jam
a taliban terrorist in california, pay raise. no, freeze for three years. over the last five years one i.c.e. agent killed, one secret service agent killed, three a.t.f. agents killed, one d.e.a. agent killed, two u.s. marshals killed, air traffic controller to put the safety for my family and your family and our constituents as they fly through the sky, the n.i.h. my family has been devastated my cancer. my father died at cancer. my mother died of cancer and it's impacted on my family. dr. collins, who mapped the human genome system that will save many of you and your lives and your sons and daughters because of basically following that system, working on liver cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, which my mom died off. dr. collins and his team will have been frozen for three years. nasa, we just went through the 10th anniversary of the challenger explosion. those astronauts that sit on that rocket, those and now in the future, if you have a nasa facility in your district and they sit on that rocket to go up, they froze for three years. firefighters out in the west wh
at the numbers. now we know the numbers were wrong. taliban attacks are not on the way down in afghanistan. as violent in 2012 as it was in 2011. no change at all. jennifer griffin live at the pentagon tonight. jennifer, what happened? >> well, with little fanfare, shep, u.s. and nate officials in afghanistan removed from their web site the month-to-month figure saying attacks by the taliban were down by 7% last year. there seemed to be a mistake. a mistake that led to administration officials making statements like this. >> violence levels have been trending downward in the last two years after five years of steady increases beginning in 2006. >> the problem is the attacks weren't trending downward. they were exactly the same as in 2011. an embarrassing admission by the pentagon that the the narrative about how the president's strategy in afghanistan was bearing fruit may have been misleading, shep. >> shepard: they must be making some case at the pentagon in their own defense. >> well, in essence, they blame the afghans. the afghan commanders supposedly forgot to submit their field repor
civilians. the strike hit a suspected taliban hideouts. most of the dead were women and children. california police say they believe former los angeles police officer christopher dorner has died in a final standoff in the snowy mountains of big bear. a suspect believed to be dorner took refuge in a cabin after a car chase. a single gunshot was reportedly heard from within the cabin before it erupted in flames. officers are now testing the dead body recovered from the site to confirm they have dorner's remains. the shares deputy was killed in the gunfight between police and dorner, bringing his victims to four. >> he abandoned his vehicle, fled on foot into the forest, barricaded himself in a cabin, and at that time, there was an exchange of fire between law enforcement personnel outside the cabin and the suspect inside. after that fight, two that the sheriffs were shot. one of them died after being taken to loma linda. the second is in surgery and is expected to survive. >> this would end a manhunt after dorner promised to exact revenge on the lapd after his firing in 2008. the senate armed
province. on the presence of foreign troops there there has been fights against taliban. after 20 years of fighting the republic of congo have moved to peace. they will try to end the conflict. we have this report from goma in eastern congo. >> for decades regional meddling has let to complex. neighbors states, desperate to ben it from its fast natural resources. this is supposed to see an end to that. they have agreed to reform government institutions as well as the army and police. >> we vigorously commit ourselves. you need to represent our obligations. and we wish that all the signatures do the same. so the framework is too vague. it is not clear how much power bodies like the u.n. will have to make sure leaders stick to their word. >> it's been on the political level some discussions between the different governments involved. and people at the grass roots levt are not hurt. the rebel group that is grown in power, building almost a state within a state but its own government and tax collection of taxes. knew power to fight the rebels. the force would be backed up by intelligence co
, the taliban and associated forces in response to the 9/11 attacks and we may also use force consistent with our inherent right of national self-defense. there is nothing in international law that bans the use of remotely pilotted aircraft for this purpose or that prohibits us from using lethal force against our enemies outside of an active battlefield at least when the country involved con cents or is unwilling to take action against a threat. second, targeted strikes are ethical. without question, the ability to target a specific individual from hundreds or thousands of miles away raises profound questions. here, i think it is useful to consider such strikes against the basic principle of the law of war that govern the use of force. targeted strikes conform to the principle of necessity. requirement that the target has definite military value. in this armed conflict, individuals who are part of al qaeda or its associated forces are legitimate military targets. we have the authority to target them with lethal force, just as we target enemy leaders in past conflicts such as them and the
. we went because it met our goal to give it about qaeda. we have been in the taliban government and set the country sorted into free play, we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them get it right. third, geostrategic plates in america in the world's interest to have a stable region. if afghanistan were unstable, acting pakistan's stability would be very tenuous and it challenges anyway, but i think it's important. my view is that we need to do is be persistent and consistent in the region. the reason people are so nervous is because in 2004 the inc. were going to leave and they seemed asleep before. in 1989 returned from the region. it doesn't matter whether each afghan style that appeared its become a commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989 and they're starting to think we're going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody they can rely on. they'll have other strategic allies. so what they looking for is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that the specific number of troops. i think it's the idea you got an ally somewhere in their
not for afghans. they didn't invite in 2001. it meant our goal to get rid of al qaeda. when we upped the taliban government and set the country in to free play, i think we developed a responsibility for helping them set it right. third, i think in america and the world's interest to have a stability region. if afghanistan were to be completely unstable, i think pakistan's stability would be very tenuous. and they have challenges anyway. i think it's important. so my view what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are nervous because in 2004, they think we're going leave and they have seen us leave before. in 1989 we turned from the region. it doesn't matter which each individual afghan saw that. it's become commonly accepted truth we left in 19 the 9 ab and they're walk in 2014. and they'll be nobody they can rely on. they don't have other strategic allies. what they're looking for, in my view, the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that's a specific number of troops in a specific amount of money. ink it's the idea you
, and as margaret follows there's a lot of diplomacy going on in secret now to see if you can bring the taliban into real peace negotiations so that we would leave with something like a settlement. we could say "here look, we're leaving but there's an agreement among these factions." >> schieffer: and you just had the president of afghanistan karzai saying he's going to forbid any more american airstrikes. he won't allow his own people to call in airstrikes because a recent one took some civilian lives. >> reporter: concern about hitting civilian areas. that's right. i think one of the other offshoots of this drop-down will be a continued presence in some form is where those asset goes. and the theory keeps getting floated what leaves afghanistan may go to the benefit of forces in within africa because of this new threat that has come to the fore and really been highlighted in terms of aqim, their presence in libya and algeria as we saw with the hostage crisis that just happened. but what that means is it's certainly not boots on the ground. it's just assets -- >> schieffer: the president didn'
of the president. i support him. we cannot change the equation at this point in time. the taliban have been determined to relentlessly attacked the afghan government. we have to not pull out and make sure we focus on a counterterrorism strategy compared to the surge strategy, which did not accomplish its goal. host: another word that was not mentioned was the use of drones in the confirmation hearing. guest: this is a controversial subject. i fall on the side of supporting our drone program relentlessly sorting our drone program to protect our troops and to prevent the united states from being harmed by terrorists. when al qaeda operatives were taken out by drones >>> in afghanistan and yemen -- by drone strikes in afghanistan and elsewhere, i commended the president for his counterterrorism policy. it has protected the homeland as best as any weapon we could have. it has been an effective way of putting al qaeda on the defense and keeping them on the run. the president deserves congratulations for being relentlessly consistent and persistent in his drone program. does that mean it has been
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
the medicine 2001. we met our goal to get rid of al qaeda. we have under the taliban government and set the country started into screenplay, we developed some more responsibility for helping him set a rate third, i think it's an america in the center a stable region. if afghanistan were completely unstable, who'd be very tenuous but it's important. we need to be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave and 18 asleep before. in 1889, we turn from the region. it doesn't matter whether each individual afghans saw that, it's become commonly accepted truth they don't have other strategic allies. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. but i think that's a specific number of troops, even a specific amount of money. their fear is they are very far away. i was asking him this question. i said what you want in the future years quite homage to see what here? said a word about business and i'll be here taking money. because if you're making money here
three kids. in october everything change would. a predawn ambush in the pakistan border. 300 taliban stormed the base where 50 american soldiers became sitting ducks in a valley surrounded by mountains owned by the income. >> what happened next is one of the most intense battles of the entire war in stanford. the attackers had the advantage and high grounds and mountains above and unleashing everything they h. >> the sergeant and others jumped from their bids and he managed to call in air support that killed 30 insurgent. rockit grenad explode cent chap nel in his hip and arm and neck. came within 10 feet. >> they charged and they kept 50 meters and 80s and 100 meter run through a hail of bullets . they reached their fallen frinds and they brought them hoim. >> staff sergeant clint romesha is a reb luctant hero. >> this awarted is for the eight soldiers that didn't make it and the rift of the team that fought valiently and magnif stently that day. >> their parents were at the white house for the medal of honor ceremony. his fellow soldiers would follow staff sergeant roimsha to hell
out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, his wrath was unleashed with an attack on our embassies. did you advise director tenant against this operation? and if so, why? >> i had a conversation with george and that at the time. every single cia manager, george tennant as deputy director of operations at the time, and other individuals at the counter-terrorism center argued against that operation as well because it was not well grounded in intelligence, and its chances of success were minimal. and it was likely that other individuals would be killed. when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my professional advice about whether i thought that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussion with the saudi government at the time. and i encouraged certain action to be taken to put pressure on the taliban as well as bin laden. >> i take it that your answer to my question is that you did advise in favor of the cancellation of that operation. >> based on what i ha
and this kid is out there in the middle of nowhere with 400 taliban and in the middle east and he's tremendously courageous and tremendously brave and taking them on saving not only fellow soldiers, but ultimately saving database. ask about bravery and courage go on often every day in a war zone and i just think it's difficult to think that everybody who performs in that kind of fashion that somehow we have to establish, you know, a separate fund to try to assist them. the reality is that men and women in uniform put their lives on the line every day. it's a sacrifice for this country. and i think the great thing about this country is that there are those that are willing to do that and not worry about whether or not they're going to get an award for additional pay, but they just do it because they love this country. >> secretary, why did you, general dempsey and secretary clinton recommend that the u.s. provide weapons to the rebel forces in syria? were you disappointed the white house turned that down? and do you think is the result of that that this war could go on endlessly? >
. >> gretchen: thanks so much. >> thank you. >> gretchen: coming up, taliban despises us. the muslim brotherhood wants to destroy us. can we afford to make defense cuts then right now? general bob scales next. [ male announcer ] how do you make america's favorite recipes? just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> i'm bill hemmer. nothing like a bombshell to start the week. the pope is resigning, full and complete reaction on this breaking story. 67 million american catholics. and a world of intrigue for who is the next leader of the church. there is news on the manhunt in california. epic snowfall as many scramble this morning. martha and i will see you in nine short minutes here on "america's newsroom." brian, back to you. >> brian: unless congress cuts a deal on our debt by march 1, our military will face deep cuts. is this something we can afford, especially when we have so many enemies around the world, like north korea, the
and defeated the taliban on our behalf not the mean he of our enemy, but these are radical islamic jihadists who want a cal fate -- caliphate in which the united states is sub jew dated to a religious -- subjugated to a religious ruler and they are willing to use violence if necessary, although the muslim brotherhood now seems to indicate that here in america they have made so much progress in infiltrating and getting positions of power in our government, our state department, in our homeland security department, in our justice department, at the white house directly, and direct lines to the president, they have made so much progress in moving toward that goal of a caliphate here in the united states under shari'a law, not under the constitution, that they are thinking maybe violence is not the way forward in america to achieve their goal of making this a shari'a compliant caliphate. but the muslim brotherhood around the world believes many places violence is the way forward in those areas. but we've got to understand who we are facing and what they want to do. and secretary clinton, unfortu
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)